Video 20 Apr 63,692 notes
 Last messages from Survivors and Students trapped inside the ferry
... PRAY FOR SOUTH KOREA

(Source: sehunphilia)

Video 20 Apr 436 notes

"i’m my own woman

—first, last —and always!”

(Source: ofsteverogers)

Video 19 Apr 10,751 notes

(Source: demolition-secret)

Video 19 Apr 10,801 notes

emchelle:

Springtime in Texas

Took a drive into the hill country to see the wildflowers and found this little spot at sunset. I could have stayed here for hours.

Video 19 Apr 117,092 notes

aneternalscoutandabrownie:

jamesmdavisson:

So far, I have been enjoying the Adventures of Business Cat a great deal, possibly more than is appropriate for an adult human. (All of these are from the webcomic Happy Jar)

UPDATE: Now with more Business.

YES ALL THE BUSINESS CAT STRIPS IN ONE PLACE

Video 19 Apr 931 notes

escapekit:

Aerial Archaeology

Photographer Klaus Leidorf captures Germany from above with images of farms, cities, industrial sites, and whatever else he discovers along his flight path, a process he refers to as “aerial archaeology.” 

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

Video 19 Apr 4,964 notes

suicideblonde:

American Psycho 

(Source: crazystupidgosling)

Video 19 Apr 257,148 notes

markdoesstuff:

tonimorrisons:

hispanic parents have a sixth sense

this… this is mesmerizing. oh my god.

(Source: versaceslut)

via bad wolf.
Text 19 Apr 343,536 notes

consultingmoosecaptain:

dalekitsune:

the phrase “curiosity killed the cat” is actually not the full phrase it actually is “curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back” so don’t let anyone tell you not to be a curious little baby okay go and be interested in the world uwu

See also:

Blood is thicker than water The blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb.

Meaning that relationships formed by choice are stronger than those formed by birth.

Photo 19 Apr 131,695 notes chrissymodi-frost:

I have to reboot this today!

chrissymodi-frost:

I have to reboot this today!

(Source: moveslikecurt)

Video 19 Apr 7,097 notes
via Birchbox.
Video 18 Apr 322 notes

zerostatereflex:

NASA’s Kepler Discovers First Earth-Size Planet In The ‘Habitable Zone’ of Another Star

"Using NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" — the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun."

Nice! Getting closer to finding our “Twin Earth..” 

Video 18 Apr 922 notes

huffpostscience:

These MRI images of fruit, vegetables and plants will change how you look at food forever. Find out what each of these MRI scans are here.

(Constructed by MRI technologist Andy Ellison at Boston University Medical School)

Video 18 Apr 349 notes

sagansense:

Regarding the recent NASA Kepler discovery of what is being dubbed the closest “Earth-like” or “Earth twin” planet…

"This planet Kepler-186f orbits a star that’s cooler and dimmer than the sun. So while we may have found a planet that’s the same size as Earth, and receives the same amount of energy to what Earth receives, it orbits a very different star. So, perhaps, instead of an Earth twin, we have discovered an Earth cousin," said NASA Ames Research Scientist Thomas Barclay, of BAERI.

Standing on the surface of Kepler-186f, this is how the view may appear. Credit: Danielle Futselaar

Not to downplay this hype, however. There’s no mistaking it…THIS IS A MAJOR MOMENT IN HUMAN HISTORY.

Astronomers have discovered planets that reside in the Goldilocks or Habitable Zone of solar systems outside of our own. This, however, is the first confirmed find of a planet as close in size (10% larger) to that of Earth.

"This is the best case for a habitable planet yet found. The results are absolutely rock solid. The planet itself may not be [rocky], but I’d bet my house on it. In any case, it’s a gem," Geoff Marcy, Astronomer at the University of California Berkeley told Space.com.

Kepler-186f’s potential for liquid water and perhaps, life, is what make its existence that much more intriguing. [view larger]

"Some people call these habitable planets, which of course we have no idea if they are, we simply know that they are in the habitable zone, and that is the best place to start looking for habitable planets," San Francisco State University astronomer and study co-author Stephen Kane said in a statement to Space.com.

"The four companion planets — Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d and Kepler-186e — whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13 and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth," noted in an official statement from NASA.

Geoff Marcy said, "This planet is modestly illuminated by its host star, a red dwarf. This planet basks in an orange-red glow from that star, much [like what] we enjoy at sunset."


Kepler-186f is 1 of 5 planets around its host star, which is a red dwarf, taking 130 days to orbit. As seen in the comparison-worthy artistic rendering above, Kepler-186f and our Earth would share similar views at dawn and dusk.


Whether or not Kepler-186f does contain life, one thing is for certain, there’s a whole lot more space to explore. If Carl were here to share in these continued findings, I believe he’d revert to a self-quoted suggestion from his novel-turned-motion-picture, Contact

“The universe is a pretty big place. If it is just us, seems like an awful waste of space.”

Stay curious. This is just the beginning.

Photo 18 Apr 109 notes inland-delta:

Frank Leyendecker, The Flapper, 1922

inland-delta:

Frank Leyendecker, The Flapper, 1922


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